Fighting spam in Discussion: new techniques

C&P Craftsman 10x15 with a Rice feeder

I anyone running one of these presses, I have a feeder question,

Log in to reply   10 replies so far

i didn’t know you could print on rice…. and now I learn that there is a feeder especially for it! I guess that’s how they print the Lord’s Prayer on those tiny little grains.

Winking cat, are you kin to dickg.?

James…. we’re no relation at all, except perhaps philosophically.

James, don’t pick on my uncle winking cat.

I have one as well, but mine isn’t running yet, so I can’t be too helpful. But, I know there are some folks who are active on the LETPRESS mailing list that have the same press, and that actively use the feeder. I’m sure you’ll be able to find help there.

So, stupid question- what does the term “Rice feeder” actually mean?
Does it refer to the inventor or some physical characteristic or ability the feeder has?

You should see the cous cous feeder!

The basic patent on the feeder was US 789,881, issued May 16, 1905 to Percy F. Rice. Here’s a copy:

http://www.galleyrack.com/temp/us-0789881.pdf

The feeder as fitted to C&P presses would seem to have been influenced by later developments - e.g., the “sheet transferring mechanism” shown in US 2,081,958 issued June 1, 1937 to Charles F. Root (and assigned to the Chandler and Price Company).

http://www.galleyrack.com/temp/us-2081958.pdf

The serial number records indicate that the first “Rice Style” feeder equipped C&P shipped in 1932, well after the expiration of Rice’s patent.

I didn’t know any of this ten minutes ago. Sometimes the Internet is nice, after all.

Regards,
David M.
www.CircuitousRoot.com

Keep oil on the vertical shaft that holds the pick-up suckers. The oil helps to keep an airtight seal; if air gets in between it won’t fully pick sheets, or won’t hold the sheets very well.

I know, I know, my question was a little bit like http://lmgtfy.com/ , but I figured someone here had some experience with it first hand or- as is often the case on this site- an uncommon tidbit of history they could share :-)