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Vintage Print Blocks

I am researching two vintage print blocks and am having trouble finding any worthwhile information. I have searched both the Library of Congress and the Carnegie Library (Pittsburgh) but have come up empty handed. The larger etched copper plate (glass decanters) measures 4 1/8” x 5” x 15/16” high and its accompanying note reads “Carnegie Magazine vol. XX, June 1946 vol. 20” with a “Liberty Engraving co., Pittsburgh, PA” stamped into the wood base. The smaller carved linoleum (a magnet does not stick to the engraving) botanical measures 3 7/8” x 2 3/16” x 15/16” with an accompanying note: ” Carnegie Magazine Vol. 17 #3, June 1943”. This is also from Liberty Engraving.

I have attached images of the blocks in question.

Any information or help you care to offer will be greatly appreciated!

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IMG_3095.JPG

image: IMG_3099.JPG

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These are photoengravings. It is hard to tell from the photos but I would guess the upper one, of the two decanters, is a halftone (is the image made up of very small dots?) and may have been an advertising image. The lower one appears to possibly have been an illustration from a botanical treatise and is a line engraving. I would not expect a magnet to stick to either one — the upper one appears to be copper, and the lower one is pretty certain to be zinc. I would expect that the images originated locally and would not be found in the Library of Congress unless you located the referenced issues of the Carnegie Magazine; I’m surprised the Carnegie Library doesn’t have the latter. I bet if you Google the Carnegie Magazine you can locate a holding that includes the referenced issues and find the cuts printed there with their associated articles.

(EDIT: The Carnegie Magazine is published by the Carnegie Museums, possibly quarterly. I would expect their central library to have copies going back. Since you know the dates of the issues it should be easy to find the cuts — assuming of course that the Carnegie Museums organization has kept a complete file.)

Bob