Does anyone have an idea on where I can find a digitized version of the old “Vogue” sans serif typeface? It’s similar to Kabel.

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Actually Vogue is a modified version of Futura, but includes several alternate characters that would enable it ti also mimic Kabel and Tempo.

For an extensive description, see Mac McGrew’s American Metal Typefaces of the Twentieth Century, which also includes a showing of all the alternate characters.

As close as I come to knowing about anything digital is the use of my own ten digits to handset type and happily dwell in my analog world.

Rick

In the other topic I pointed to a version that is the only one I could find…

http://www.abstractfonts.com/font/12605

It isn’t perfect, but it is all I could find.

Lord save us all. WTF is Am Sans, Regular??????????

Looks a whole lot like Futura. I am not near any reference materials so I’ll just shoot from the hip here.

What I read it McGrew’s book was that Vogue was pretty much Futura, but that the caps had been raised to the height if the ascenders. The ascenders and descenders were also a little more extended than normal Futura. There are ALSO alternate caps and alternate lowercase characters included in Vogue. A REAL digital version of Vogue would arm you with enough alternate characters to do a LOT creative typography.

This simply reinforces that I have made the right choice to stay analog using the 2,000+ fonts of handset type in my shop. I do not have Vogue because it was an Internet face and I do not have any linecasting machines.

The FIRST thing you need to do is get a proof of the complete original Vogue typeface and then start your search from there.

Rick

Lord save us all. WTF is Am Sans, Regular??????????

Looks a whole lot like Futura. I am not near any reference materials so I’ll just shoot from the hip here.

What I read it McGrew’s book was that Vogue was pretty much Futura, but that the caps had been raised to the height if the ascenders. The ascenders and descenders were also a little more extended than normal Futura. There are ALSO alternate caps and alternate lowercase characters included in Vogue. A REAL digital version of Vogue would arm you with enough alternate characters to do a LOT creative typography.

This simply reinforces that I have made the right choice to stay analog using the 2,000+ fonts of handset type in my shop. I do not have Vogue because it was an Internet face and I do not have any linecasting machines.

The FIRST thing you need to do is get a proof of the complete original Vogue typeface and then start your search from there.

Rick

Lord save us all. WTF is Am Sans, Regular??????????

Looks a whole lot like Futura. I am not near any reference materials so I’ll just shoot from the hip here.

What I read it McGrew’s book was that Vogue was pretty much Futura, but that the caps had been raised to the height if the ascenders. The ascenders and descenders were also a little more extended than normal Futura. There are ALSO alternate caps and alternate lowercase characters included in Vogue. A REAL digital version of Vogue would arm you with enough alternate characters to do a LOT creative typography.

This simply reinforces that I have made the right choice to stay analog using the 2,000+ fonts of handset type in my shop. I do not have Vogue because it was an Internet face and I do not have any linecasting machines.

The FIRST thing you need to do is get a proof of the complete original Vogue typeface and then start your search from there.

Rick

Rick, Intertype Vogue (as opposed to Stephenson Blake Vogue) was specifically mentioned here…

http://acknak.blogspot.com/2007/11/am-sans-digital-version-of-intertype....

As can be seen from the discussion Volker Busse was trying to create a Vogue like face. I have found a face with the same name but a different look.

I also found a reference to the fact that Vogue contained 8 alternate character sets, and an intertype specimen that shows both the Q with the diagonal tail and the Q with the vertical tail.

https://www.designspiration.net/save/2085912149327/

http://www.typophile.com/node/117320 is also worth looking at. Am sand by Volker Busse is mentioned in all of these. People do not appear to be saying it is Vogue, but that it is the closest that you are likely to find in digital format.

Personally I have nothing against digital fonts, but for letterpress work I like hand set type and cuts. I don’t use photopolymer myself, and I realise that you can do different (new) things with it, but while it has advantages it is not for me.

Z.