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C&P broken part

Hi BP’ers!

I have a problem with my press and I need some help/suggestions for what to do to fix it. You see, I was running it and the counter was loose and fell into the arms of the press as it was turning. The result was that the piece that holds the rollers on got broken. I attached a photo so you can see it. I’m guessing that I could either replace the entire structure that holds the rollers on, or just the part that got broken. Re-cast it or try and find one from another press are probably the options. So, my press is 7 x 11 C&P. Please let me know if you have any suggestions for this.

Thank you!

image: press.jpg

press.jpg

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I’d just get another press. In the long run it would be cheaper and easier. If the amount of wear shown on the single roller saddle is true of the rest of the press, it is very, very worn.

I’d have to agree with the Imp on this. I don’t know what interchangeability there is between the 8x12 and the 7x11. You would have better luck finding the arm for an 8x12 than you would for the 7x11, a much more rare press, unless they are actually the same part.

If the press was working well for you before the accident, then I would go for finding a part, otherwise the cost is probably less to find an 8x12 in good condition, possibly better than the press you have. If the wear we can see in the photo reflects the general condition of the press, you could do much better. In all likelihood if the owner didn’t lube the roller saddles, they probably didn’t maintain the other bearing surfaces which are less visible..

Just get another press!! seems a bit drastic for a (once) beautiful old machine that s reached this far already, and probably still got a lot left to offer, have a new part recast if you can find a foundry anyway, pay a lot of money and then still have to have it machined for a lot more money? OR possibly remove the section, (presumably cast iron) find a good welder , there must be several within spitting distance, “V” the broken section out to within 10% of the base, (to keep the register and the alignment) and then watch him, The Welder, put in a root weld and as much as it takes to fill the “V” back to original contour with BRONZE welding, sometimes called brazing, or siff bronze welding 95% of the time stronger than original.

There was a wrecked c&p on here recently but cant remember for sure if i see it will direct you to it .

Sorry it was a larger machine , reference hellonifty.

There are some folks who are in press poor parts of the country, and cannot rely on the possibility of finding a 8 x 12 for say $500 (more like $500-800 delivered at minimum).

I would pull off the whole offending arm, find a good older machineshop that is VERY good at welding cast iron. Budget $300 for this and have the machine shop weld up the part and ensure that the roller spring rod will still move freely.

When the work is done, take the part home and print. If the machine has provided you good work and reliability to this point, there’s not much sense in scrapping/abandoning the press. Your mileage may vary.

BTW, I got a Windmill for $500 from a scrap yard, but had to have the motor mounts (both) welded for $200. Plenty well worth it.

I can understand the suggestion to get another press, but I too would encourage you to take these pieces to your local welder and ask them what can be done. I’ve always been very impressed by the skill and workmanship of the welders I’ve worked with. If they know how to work with cast iron there should be no problems getting this press back in service.

As an aside: 8x12 parts are not interchangeable with the older 7x11. The 7x11 is a rare press, so if you do decide to get another machine make sure you post the 7x11 in the BP classifieds… I’m sure there’s someone out there who needs the parts.

Brad.

Thank you all for your replies. I’ve had the press for 2 years now, and it works well, so I will go ahead and get it welded. I definitely live in the “press poor” area of the Rocky Mountain region. We don’t come by presses here too often.

I spoke with Hern Iron Works in N Idaho to see if they could re-cast, but they don’t do any parts for 7 x 11, and it would be prohibitively expensive to start from scratch. The gentleman I spoke with did recommend a type of welding rod called “super cast” from a company called United Allow. Anyone heard of this?

Here’s another question; can bent roller cores be straightened?

On a C&P, it’s probably easier to have new cores made up. I suspect that the 7 x 11 and 8 x 12 C&P share the same size roller core, so a roller company making new 8 x 12 rollers should be able to make new 7 x 11 rollers. This would include all features.

If you mean the roller saddle shafts, ask the machine shop if they straighten or know somebody who can straighten hydraulic cylinders or shafts—that ought to do the trick.

On a C&P, it’s probably easier to have new cores made up. I suspect that the 7 x 11 and 8 x 12 C&P share the same size roller core, so a roller company making new 8 x 12 rollers should be able to make new 7 x 11 rollers. This would include all features.

If you mean the roller saddle shafts, ask the machine shop if they straighten or know somebody who can straighten hydraulic cylinders or shafts—that ought to do the trick.